SS BPC.ORG | Home | Westminster Shorter Catechism Project | Vincent's "The Shorter Catechism Explained from Scripture"
[DOCUMENT INFO: LAST MODIFIED ON (EST)]

Westminster Shorter Catechism Project

The Shorter Catechism
of the Westminster Assembly
Explained and Proved
from Scripture

by
Thomas Vincent


XXI. Ques. Who is the Redeemer of God's elect?
Ans.
The only Redeemer of God's elect is the Lord Jesus Christ, who, being the eternal Son of God, became man, and so was, and continueth to be, God and man in two distinct natures, and one person for ever.

Q. 1. What is he called that is the Redeemer of God's elect?
A. The Redeemer of God's elect is called the Lord Jesus Christ.

Q. 2. Why is he called the Lord?
A. Because of his universal sovereignty and dominion. "He is Lord of all." Acts 10:36.

Q. 3. Why is he called Jesus?
A. Because he is the Saviour of his people. "Thou shalt call his name Jesus; for he shall save his people from their sins." Matt. 1:21.

Q. 4. Why is he called Christ?
A. Because he is anointed by the Father unto his office with the Holy Ghost, which was given to him without measure. "God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost, and with power." Acts 10:38. "God giveth not the Spirit by measure unto him." John 3:34.

Q. 5. How doth the Lord Jesus Christ redeem the elect of God?
A. The Lord Jesus Christ doth redeem the elect of God 1. By purchase, paying the price of his blood for them. "Ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot." 1 Pet. 1:18, 19. "Who gave himself a ransom." 1 Tim. 2:6. 2. By conquest, rescuing them, through his almighty power, out of the snare of the devil, who before led them captive. "He led captivity captive." Eph. 4:3. "And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a show of them openly, triumphing over them." Col. 2:15.

Q. 6. Whose Son is the Lord Jesus Christ?
A. The Lord Jesus Christ is the eternal Son of God.

Q. 7. How doth the Lord Jesus Christ differ from other sons of God?
A. 1. Angels are called the sons of God; but they are sons of God by creation. "All the sons of God shouted for joy." Job 38:7. 2. Saints are called the sons of God, by adoption and regeneration. "That we might receive the adoption of sons." Gal. 4:5. "Every one that loveth is born of God." 1 John 4:7. 3. The Lord Jesus Christ is the natural Son of God by eternal generation. "Unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee " Heb. 1:5.

Q. 8. What did Christ, the eternal Son of God, become, that he might redeem the elect?
A. Christ, that he might redeem the elect, being the eternal Son of God, became man. "And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father), full of grace and truth." John 1:14. "When the fulness of time was come, God sent forth his Son made of a woman;" &c. Gal. 4:4.

Q. 9. How was it necessary in order to the redemption of the elect, that Christ should become man?
A. It was necessary, in order to the redemption of the elect, that Christ should become man (1.) That he might be capable of suffering death for them, which, as God, he was incapable of: without which suffering of death there could have been no remission or salvation. "Without shedding of blood there is no remission." Heb. 9:22. (2.) That he might be their high priest to reconcile them unto God. "For verily he took not on him the nature of angels, but the seed of Abraham; wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people." Heb. 2:16, 17.

Q. 10. Was it necessary that the Redeemer of the elect should be God as well as man?
A. Yes; because if he had not been God as well as man, 1. He could not have borne up under, nor have got loose from, the weight of wrath which was laid upon him for the sins of men. 2. His sufferings would have been of finite extent, and so could not have made satisfaction to God's infinite justice, which was offended by sin.

Q. 11. How is Christ God and man?
A. Christ is God and man by an hypostatical or personal union, both his natures, divine and human, remaining distinct without composition or confusion, in one and the same person.

Q. 12. Will this union of the divine and human natures in Christ ever be dissolved?
A. No; for he was, and continueth to be, God and man in two distinct natures, and one person for ever. "Because he continueth for ever, he hath an unchangeable priest. hood." Heb. 7:24.

Q. 13. May the properties of the divine nature be ascribed to the human nature, or the properties of the human nature be ascribed to the divine nature of Christ?
A. Though it be improper to ascribe the properties of the one nature to the other nature, yet, by virtue of this near union of both natures in one person, there is a communication of the properties of each nature to the person of Christ.

[ Go To Top Of This Page ]
 


This document is available at http://bpc.org/resources/vincent/wsc_vi_021.html
Corrections or Information: webmaster@bpc.org